Interesting fact: The earliest known written record that likely referred to diabetes was in 1500 B.C in the Egyptian Ebers papyrus. It referred to the symptoms of frequent urination.

Basically, diabetes is a disease in which the body experiences elevated levels of blood sugar (glucose) due to an inability to either produce or use insulin. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, which our body needs for energy. In response to the rise in blood glucose, the pancreas makes a hormone called insulin, to help move the glucose into our cells for an ongoing source of energy. When you have diabetes, the body either doesn’t make enough insulin (Type-1 DM) or can’t use its own insulin efficiently (Type-2 DM). This causes glucose to build up in the blood, creating a potentially dangerous situation.

Type-1 DM is a chronic auto-immune health condition in which the immune system ravages the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, causing a loss of the hormone insulin and affecting the way glucose is metabolized. Because of the loss of insulin, the body cannot move glucose from the blood into the cells where it is needed. Instead, glucose levels run high in the blood causing system-wide damage. While Integrative holistic health approaches can support the body, there is no cure once the pancreas are completely damaged and life-long management REQUIRES insulin. As a functional medicine doctor I have see halting of the disease process and even reversal if on early testing of the patient, the anti-bodies specific for type 1 diabetes are picked up and appropriate measures instituted. For more information on this contact my office.

Type-2 DM develops from lifestyle choices. A highly preventable disease, it was once most common in middle-aged and older people. Today, it strikes an alarming number of young adults and children. It’s directly related to poor eating and exercise habits, which typically results in being overweight – a risk factor for Type-2 DM. In this type of diabetes, your body produces insulin but does not recognize and use it properly. If health is not restored through diet, lifestyle changes, and holistic approaches, Type-2 DM can progress to a state in which insulin is required.

insulin resistance & Pre-diabetes are  your warning signs, conditions, respectively in which your insulin levels are high but the body cannot utilize it appropriately and the blood glucose level is chronically above normal, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as Type-2 DM. These stages is your chance to stop the onset of diabetes in its tracks by improving your lifestyle choices.

 

A few simple guidelines can help you manage diabetes, and even prevent Type-2 DM:

  • Eat fresh whole foods, drink plenty of water, increase dietary fiber and the amount of dark fruits and veggies in your daily diet. Avoid processed foods and added sugars. Eat what a plant makes, not what is made in a plant!
  • Exercise 30 minutes per day everyday.
  • Supplement with a good high quality  multivitamin/mineral, pure Omega-3 Essential Fatty Acids and B- complex vitamin with activated bioavailable forms of B vitamins.
  • Test your vitamin D levels and make sure they are optimal. Take supplementation if necessary to raise levels.
  • To get higher support for blood sugars try a supplement formulation specially created for that purpose and a meal replacement shake which has ingredients that support a healthy blood sugar and weight.
  • Try a safe and guided detoxification protocol a few times a year especially in the spring and the fall to give a “reboot” service to your body.
  • Consult with a registered dietitian with functional medicine training or a Health Coach to learn how to plan and prepare healthy meals.
  • Ask your Functional medicine doctor about food allergy and sensitivity testing; nutritional deficiency testing; and comprehensive gut function testing. Also check into your adrenal health as high cortisol levels can lead to or exaggerate your condition.
  • Make sure you’re not constipated. If so increase fiber in your diet, and if needed try safe supportive supplements. Daily bowel movement(s) is imperative to good health!
  • Take high quality multi-species probiotic supplements in the capsule or powder forms. These come in refrigerated or shelf stable forms. I love to use the latter during my travels!
  • Keep your skin healthy (hydration and whole foods). Use non-toxic personal care products
  • Use natural remedies such as herbal supplements, vitamins, detoxification, and dietary adjustments under the supervision of a Board certified Integrative Medicine (ABOIM) physician and Functional Medicine trained physician (IFMCP). Try a safe and guided detoxification protocol a few times a year.
  • Take medications or supplements as directed by your primary care doctor or endocrinologist.
  • Take particular care of your feet. Carefully monitor wounds, because many people with DM experience poor circulation and neuropathy. Vitamin C and zinc can help support would healing
  • Don’t forget to take care of your mind and spirit! Emotions, stress, lack of sleep all affect the metabolic functioning of the body. Practice mindfulness of some form daily!

If you’ve been diagnosed with Diabetes mellitus (DM), or even pre-diabetes and Insulin resistance, don’t take it lightly. Follow treatment plans and lifestyle recommendations strictly. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to many complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. It’s the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.

References
  • Murray, M.T., “Diabetes Mellitus” in Pizzorno, Joseph E. (2013). Textbook of Natural Medicine. St. Louis, MO Elsevier. p. 898; 1340; (chapter 161), 1320-1348.
  • National Institutes of Health. Diabetes. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/types
  • Joslin Diabetes Center. http://www.joslin.org/info/general_diabetes_facts_and_information.html
  • Centers for Disease Control. Rates of Diabetes Diagnosed. http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/statistics/prev/national/figbyage.htm
  • Weston A Price Foundation: Treating Diabetes. http://www.westonaprice.org/modern-diseases/treating-diabetes-practical-advice-for-combatting-a-modern-epidemic/
Image attribution: AndreyPopov/bigstockphoto.com

 

The information offered by this blog is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this blog.
© Praana Integrative Medicine & Holistic Health Center, LLC. All rights reserved

February 19th, 2017

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Coming from an Indian heritage, lentils have been an important part of my daily meals all my life. I absolutely love them and really wanted to share their beneficial properties with all of you readers and foodies!

Around the world, people enjoy the health benefits of lentils, part of a group of proteins known as pulses, which also includes beans, peas, chickpeas. Naturally gluten-free, lentils are rich in dietary fiber, protein, calcium, potassium, zinc, and iron. They help support lower cholesterol levels and are a great addition to the diet especially for people diagnosed with blood glucose/ blood sugar disorders.

Prior to the use of pharmaceutical medicines, lentils were used to deal with diabetic conditions. When included with a meal, the high fiber content helps prevent blood glucose from rising rapidly after eating. Although calorie dense (230 cal/ one cup serving), lentils are low in fat and very filling – you won’t be hungry after a lentil meal! I can vouch for that one from extended personal experience!

You can find lentils in the bulk bin aisle or in prepackaged containers.

A few tips on purchasing and cooking:

When purchasing in bulk, try to buy organic and make sure there is no moisture in the bin or in the packaging. Look for whole, not cracked lentils. Store them in an airtight container in a cool, dark and dry place. They will keep up to a year. When buying canned lentils, watch for added salt or other preservatives. though I don’t recommend canned food AT ALL, just for your information, unlike other canned veggies, lentils do not lose much of their nutritional potency.

Lentils are easy to prepare (I do like to pre-soak them but if in a hurry, can cook without presoaking unlike other dry beans). Wash and strain lentils under cool water before cooking. You can boil lentils (I like to use my pressure cooker as a matter of habit, but you can use an Instant Pot as well if you have one) and store in the fridge for later use in casseroles, soups, rice or pasta dishes, salads, spreads/hummus, or soups. Cooked lentils stay fresh in the fridge in a covered container for about three days.

Write in the comments if you liked these tips and how you use lentils and share some of your favorite recipes if you can so all of us can benefit.

I look forward to hearing from you!

 

References:
  • Future of Food: Pulses & Nutrition. Accessed on 6 Sep 2016: http://pulses.org/future-of-food/pulses-nutrition
  • Video: NutritionFact.org. “Diabetics Should Take Their Pulses” http://nutritionfacts.org/video/diabetics-should-take-their-pulses/
  • Helmstadter, A. “Antidiabetic drugs used in Europe prior to the discovery of insulin.” Pharmazie (2007) 62(9):717 – 720. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17944329
  • MedicalNewsToday.com. Accessed 6 Sep 2016: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/297638.php
  • World’s Healthiest Foods: Lentils. Accessed 6 Sep 2016: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=52
  • Singhal, P., Kaushik, G., Mathur,P. “Antidiabetic potential of commonly consumed legumes: A review.” Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr (2014) 54(5):655 – 672. Accessed 6 Sep 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24261538
  • Thompson, S.V., Winham, D.M., Hutchins, A.M. “Bean and rice meals reduce postprandial glycemic response in adults with type 2 diabetes: A cross-over study.” Nutr J (2012) 11:23. Accessed 6 Sep 2016: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22494488
  • MindBodyGreen.com. “7 Health Benefits of Lentils” Accessed 6 Sep 2016: http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-5488/7-Health-Benefits-of-Lentils.html
Image attribution: rtsubin/bigstockphoto.com
The information offered by this blog is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this blog.
© Praana Integrative Medicine & Holistic Health Center, LLC. All rights reserved

February 19th, 2017

Posted In: Blog Post, Food, Integrative Medicine, Recipes

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Hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha)

Hawthorn, also known as Maybush, is a thorny shrub found on hillsides and in sunlit woodsey areas throughout the world. Over centuries, all parts of the plant have been used to prepare foods, beverages, and medicines. In folk medicine, Hawthorn was used for the treatment of diarrhea, insomnia, and asthma. In China, it has been used to treat digestive problems, high cholesterol, poor circulation, and shortness of breath. During the early 1800s, doctors in North America used Hawthorn for heart conditions, circulatory, and respiratory disorders.

Hawthorn has a rich supply of flavonoids (antioxidants that protect cells from damage) and anti-inflammatory properties, which are important to heart health. It plays a role in helping dilate blood vessels, improves blood flow to the heart, and can lower blood pressure. In Europe, Hawthorn is regarded as a safe and effective treatment for early-stage heart disease. It is used to promote the health of the circulatory system and in patients with angina, high blood pressure, and congestive heart failure. In studies, patients with heart failure who took Hawthorn showed improvement in clinical symptoms and sense of wellbeing.

Hawthorn heart

Hawthorn is available as tea, capsule, tincture, and standardized extract found in prescription drugs, over-the-counter medication, standardized herbal medicine, or dietary supplements. Before taking Hawthorn, especially if you suspect or have a heart or lung condition, consult with a FUnctional medicine / Integrative holistic medical professional.

 

Resources
Hawthorn. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide. University of Maryland Medical Center Online. https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/hawthorn
Johnson, Rebecca L. & Foster, Steven et al., National Geographic Guide to Medicinal Herbs: The World’s Most Effective Healing Plants. (National Geographic Society. (2010, 2014), 123-125.
Hawthorn Berry (Crateagus Oxycanthus): Health Benefits. http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-hawthorn-berry.html
Mars, Bridgitte & Fiedler, Chrystle. Home Reference Guide to Holistic Health & Healing. (Beverly, MA: Fair Winds Press. 2015.), 189.
Dahmer, S., Scott, E. “Health Effects of Hawthorne,” Amer Family Phys. (Feb 15, 2010) 81:4, 465-468. Accessed: Dec. 09, 2015: http://www.aafp.org/afp/2010/0215/p465.html
Chang, W., Dao, J., and Shao, Z. “Hawthorn: Potential Roles in Cardiovascular Disease.” American Jnl. Chinese Medicine (January 2005) 33:01, pp. 1-10. DOI: 10.1142/S0192415X05002606. http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0192415X05002606?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&
ie Wang, Xingjiang Xiong, and Bo Feng, “Effect of Crataegus Usage in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: An Evidence-Based Approach,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2013, Article ID 149363, 16 pages, 2013. doi:10.1155/2013/149363.
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/149363/
Image attribution: morisfoto/bigstockphoto.com
The information offered by this blog is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this blog.

 

February 7th, 2016

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Heart stethoscopeLong before the ancient Greek surgeon Galen carried out meticulous dissections of the heart, the Egyptians wrote about health and disease in relation to how the heart “speaks in vessels” with the rest of the body. Today, physicians may not associate the heart with the soul (or soul mates), but many credit early Egyptian medical knowledge of the heart as a precursor to modern cardiology.

 

The Heart: Powerful, but VulnerableHeart stethoscope

A key element of a healthy body is a healthy heart. The heart is the center of our cardiovascular system and beats an average of 100,000 times per day supplying oxygen rich blood to the whole body. Every day we make choices that have a profound affect on the health of this vital organ. Most heart disease (HD) is linked to inflammatory risk factors such as lack of exercise, obesity, smoking, stress, and poor eating habits.

One major condition that can develop with these risk factors is Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Often called the ‘silent killer’, Hypertension can cause significant damage throughout the cardiovascular and other body systems and ultimately results in over 80 million deaths each year.

The Silent Killer

Blood pressure is the amount of pressure exerted on the inside of blood vessels as the heart pumps the blood through the body. When there is resistance in the vessels, the pressure rises and hypertension results. The longer hypertension goes undetected and/or uncontrolled, the greater the damage to blood vessels and other organs. Hypertension can lead to heart attack, stroke, ruptured blood vessels, kidney disease or failure, and heart failure.

Warning signs for high blood pressure are rare but can include headaches, blurred vision, light-headedness, shortness of breath and nosebleeds. However, there are typically no warning signs or symptoms for hypertension, which is why it is called the silent killer.

Hypertension is diagnosed by looking at 2 numbers in your BP reading: Systolic pressure (the top number) is the pressure in your arteries when the heart beats (contracts). Diastolic pressure (bottom number) represents the pressure in your arteries between beats.

• Normal blood pressure is below 120/80
• Prehypertension is 120 – 139 systolic or 80 – 89 diastolic.
• Hypertension is 140/90 or higher

The Potassium Secret for a Healthy Heart
You’ve no doubt heard the best thing to do when you have hypertension is to reduce the amount of salt/sodium in your diet. Did you know the average adult needs 4,700 mg of potassium daily compared to only 200 mg of sodium. Unfortunately for most of us, our eating habits give us way too much sodium – 3,300 mg a day – and not nearly enough potassium. This imbalance can increase your risk of developing hypertension.

What’s truly important for your heart, and a more accurate strategy to prevent high blood pressure, is to balance the relationship between potassium and sodium (salt) in your daily diet. Proper sodium-potassium balance is necessary for nerve transmission, muscle contraction, fluid balance, and the optimal health of all the cells in your body. In regard to the heart, potassium is particularly important for regulating heart rhythm and maintaining blood pressure.

By reducing your sodium intake, you are often correcting the sodium-potassium imbalance without realizing it. To further support your heart health, eat more potassium-rich foods such as sweet potato, spinach, banana, peas, legumes, apricots, avocados, halibut and molasses.

More Healthy Heart Tips & Heart-Healthy Diet Do’s:

  • Eat a variety of fresh fruits and dark green veggies daily.
  • Use plant-based oils for cooking.
  • Eat mindfully, not on-the-run.
  • Reduce or eliminate packaged foods, sugar, and red meat.
  • Walk, No Need to Run: 30 minutes of daily, brisk walking lowers your risk for hypertension.
  • Be Calm: Learn to manage stress with healthy coping techniques, such as, deep breathing, yoga, meditation, gratitude journaling, and getting quality sleep.
  • Supplemental Support: Nutritional supplements shown to support heart health include Hawthorn, CoQ10, Essential Fatty Acids (Omega 3), Magnesium, Garlic and B-vitamins. Always speak with your Integrative/ Functional Medicine physician as to which forms of these supplements and what doses are optimal for you as all forms are not equal in efficacy or quality. Supplements you might have heard about—Natto-K (nattokinase), Guggul, or Niacin—should not be taken without the supervision of your health practitioner.

Because some blood pressure medications affect the potassium level in the body, be sure and discuss the best strategy for making this adjustment with your Functional Medicine Physician /Integrative Holistic Doctor.

Resources:
Murray, M. “Hypertension” as cited in Pizzorno, Joseph E. (2013). Textbook of Natural Medicine. St. Louis, MO Elsevier. (chapter 174), 1475-1485.
Johnson, R.L., S. Foster, Low Dog, T. and Kiefer, D. “Plants and the Heart” in National Geographic Guide to Medicinal Herbs: The World’s Most Effective Healing Plants. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic, 2012. 100-101.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Underlying Cause of Death 1999-2013 on CDC WONDER Online Database, released 2015. Data are from the Multiple Cause of Death Files, 1999-2013, through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. Accessed on December 11, 2015.: http://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html
Mayo Clinic. “High Blood Pressure- Hypertension.” Updated November 10, 2015. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/basics/definition/con-20019580
National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute. “Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure.” Updated September 2015. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hbp/atrisk
Lelong, H., Galan, P. et al., “Relationship Between Nutrition and Blood Pressure: A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the NutriNet-Santé Study, a French Web-based Cohort Study” Am J Hypertens first published online September 3, 2014 doi:10.1093/ajh/hpu164. Accessed on Dec 21, 2015: http://ajh.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/09/03/ajh.hpu164
Study above cited in Time magazine article, accessed on Dec 21, 2015: http://time.com/3313332/salt-and-blood-pressure/
Appel, L.J., Brands, M.W., et al., American Heart Association. “Scientific Statement: Dietary Approaches to Prevent and Treat Hypertension.” Updated January 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.HYP.0000202568.01167.B6
American Heart Association. “Learn more about heart disease and high blood pressure.” Accessed on December 11, 2015. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/High-Blood-Pressure-or-Hypertension_UCM_002020_SubHomePage.jsp
American Heart Association. “Walk, Don’t Run Your Way to a Healthy Heart.” Accessed on December 11, 2015.
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/PhysicalActivity/Walking/Walk-Dont-Run-Your-Way-to-a-Healthy-Heart_UCM_452926_Article.jsp#.Vop0pDYwcrg
Also see:
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Conditions_UCM_001087_SubHomePage.jsp
American Heart Association. “Walking Can Lower Risk of Heart Related Conditions” Accessed on December 11, 2015.
http://newsroom.heart.org/news/walking-can-lower-risk-of-heart-related-conditions-as-much-as-running
American Heart Association. “Potassium and high blood pressure.” Last Updated August 04, 2014. Accessed on December 11, 2015.
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/PreventionTreatmentofHighBloodPressure/Potassium-and-High-Blood-Pressure_UCM_303243_Article.jsp#.Vopz2DYwcrg
Harvard School of Public Health. “Shifting the Balance of Sodium and Potassium in Your Diet.” Accessed on December 11, 2015. http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/sodium-potassium-balance/
Linus Pauling Institute: Micronutrient Information Center. “Sodium (Chloride).” Last Reviewed 2008. Accessed on December 11, 2015. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/sodium
Linus Pauling Institute: Micronutrient Information Center. “Potassium.” Last Reviewed 2010. Accessed on December 11, 2015. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/potassium
Image attribution:
lola1960/bigstockphoto.com
The information offered by this blog is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this blog.

February 7th, 2016

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